share
by Alex Palmer | June 30, 2015
Employees feel employers could be doing a better job at communicating with them, a new survey finds. New findings from workplace mobile app maker theEMPLOYEEapp finds that less than half of American workers feel their employers do a sufficient job of communicating information to them.

The findings come from the second part of the "2015 Mobile Trends in the Workplace Study," which drew on the responses of more than 200 workers. The results showed that workers put a high level of importance on their interactions with employers, as 68 percent of respondents said the frequency of communication with employers affects their job satisfaction and 62 percent said the methods of communication used impacts their job satisfaction.

Despite this, just 45 percent of workers felt their employer did a strong enough job communicating with them, while 33 percent said they would like more frequent communication. 

Part of the issue may be the channels that company leadership uses to communicate with staff. Respondents reported that 89 percent of their companies use email for internal communication, and 80 percent communicate in person. Just 24 percent use text messaging, 10 percent use mobile apps, and 8 percent use social collaboration tools. Since use of these more recent communications tools skew younger, it may be that their lack of use more greatly affects the younger workers.

 "Half of the respondents to theEMPLOYEEapp survey identified themselves as part of the 'Millennial' or 'Gen X' generations," said theEMPLOYEEapp Founder and CEO Jeff Corbin. "And it is well established that [the Millennial and Gen X generations] are growing and will constitute the vast majority of the workforce in the coming years," said Corbin. "Since these individuals grew up with a cell phone in their hand and are accustomed to having instantaneous access to information, communications solutions like mobile apps, social collaboration, and messaging tools need be considered if a company is serious about engaging with its employees."

The first part of the survey looked at the needs of remote and on-the-go workers.