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by Leo Jakobson | April 10, 2012
American workers are more confident now in the economy, the job market, and their own ability to find jobs than anytime since October 2007, according to a survey released last week by Randstad, a Fortune 500 company which says it is the second-largest staffing organization in the world. 

Predictions of an exodus of fed-up, burned-out, under-appreciated employees speeding out the door as soon as the job market improves have become rampant in the past 18 months to two years, as the U.S. economy has slowly stabilized. That has led employee engagement experts to warn companies to begin focusing on employee engagement strategies again.

The March Randstad Employment Report found that 45 percent of respondents are confident in their ability to find a new job, while fully 34 percent said they are likely to look for a new job. About a third of the respondents feel the economy is getting stronger—the seventh consecutive monthly increase.  

“It seems as though optimism in the employment picture is outweighing any mixed signals being given by other economic reports,” says Joanie Ruge, senior vice president and chief employment analyst for Randstad US Holding. “In fact, the index confirms, from a frontline perspective, an optimistic and hopeful outlook around the number of job openings, job stability and the future strength of companies.”

The report’s Employee Confidence Index was at 55.5 in March, the third straight monthly increase. That’s more than 15 points above the all-time low in January 2007, but five points below the historical high. 

The online survey of 1,399 employed U.S. adults was conducted from March 13-15 by research firm Harris Interactive. 

American workers are more confident now in the economy, the job market, and their own ability to find jobs than anytime since October 2007, according to a survey released Monday by Randstad, a Fortune 500 company which says it is the second-largest staffing organization in the world. 

Predictions of an exodus of fed-up, burned-out, under-appreciated employees speeding out the door as soon as the job market improves have become rampant in the past 18 months to two years, as the U.S. economy has slowly stabilized. That has led employee engagement experts to warn <http://www.incentivemag.com/article.aspx?id=7971>companies to begin focusing on employee engagement strategies again.

The March Randstad Employment Report found that 45 percent of the respondents said they are confident in their ability to find a new job, while fully 34 percent said they are likely to look for a new job. About a third of the respondents feel the economy is getting stronger—the seventh consecutive monthly increase.  

“It seems as though optimism in the employment picture is outweighing any mixed signals being given by other economic reports,” says Joanie Ruge, senior vice president and chief employment analyst for Randstad US Holding. “In fact, the index confirms, from a frontline perspective, an optimistic and hopeful outlook around the number of job openings, job stability and the future strength of companies.”

The report’s Employee Confidence Index was at 55.5 in March, the third straight monthly increase. That’s more than 15 points above the all-time low in January 2007, but five points below the historical high. 

The online survey of 1,399 employed U.S. adults was conducted from March 13-15 by research firm Harris Interactive.